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15 Best Novels To Read in India During This Lockdown

15 Best Novels To Read in India During This Lockdown (Download links also included)

Best Novels To Read in India While You're Self-Isolating. It's an isolate time, and we as a whole are sitting at home with no work and no play. So we ought to enjoy a portion of different exercises, yet in the event that you love understanding books, at that point you should peruse the best books to peruse in English which we have referenced in this article.These given books merit perusing as they are sentimental, profound, and more from the celebrated Authors of India like Durjoy Dutta, Salman Rushdie's, and numerous more.Best books to peruse to improve English and give you the information and significantly more. So perusing a book is something which we should keep practically speaking and not simply during the Self-Isolation time.

1.The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life is the second book by blogger and author Mark Manson. In it Manson argues that life's struggles give it meaning, and that the mindless positivity of typical self-help books is neither practical nor helpful. It was a bestseller.

The book is a reaction to the self-help industry and what Manson saw as a culture of mindless positivity that isn't practical or helpful for most people. Manson uses many of his own personal experiences to illustrate how life's struggles often give it more meaning, which, he argues, is a better approach than constantly trying to be happy.[4] Manson's approach and writing style have been categorized by some as contrarian to the general self-help industry, using blunt honesty and profanity to illustrate his ideas.


2.The God of Small Things
The God of Small Things is the debut novel of Indian writer Arundhati Roy. It is a story about the childhood experiences of fraternal twins whose lives are destroyed by the "Love Laws" that lay down "who should be loved, and how. And how much." The book explores how the small things affect people's behavior and their lives. It won the Booker Prize in 1997.

The God of Small Things was Roy's first book and only novel until the 2017 publication of The Ministry of Utmost Happiness twenty years later. She began writing the manuscript for The God of Small Things in 1992 and finished four years later, in 1996. It was published the following year. The potential of the story was first recognized by Pankaj Mishra, an editor with HarperCollins, who sent it to three British publishers. Roy received £500,000 in advance and rights to the book were sold in 21 countries.


3.Train To Pakistan
Train to Pakistan is a historical novel by Khushwant Singh, published in 1956. It recounts the Partition of India in August 1947 through the perspective of Mano Majra, a fictional border village.
Instead of depicting the Partition in terms of only the political events surrounding it, Singh digs into a deep local focus, providing a human dimension which brings to the event a sense of reality, horror, and believability.

In a relatively short book, the reader gets to know a lot of characters in detail. Examination of the varied groups of people not only increases cultural and social understanding of that time and place, but also shows that the blame could not be placed on any one group; all were responsible.


4. 2 States: The Story of My Marriage
2 States: The Story of My Marriage commonly known as 2 States is a 2009 novel written by Chetan Bhagat. It is the story about a couple coming from two different states in India, who face hardships in convincing their parents to approve of their marriage.

 The story is about a couple Krish and Ananya, who hail from two different states of India, Punjab and Tamil Nadu, respectively, who are deeply in love and want to marry. It is narrated from a first person point of view in a humorous tone, often taking digs at both Tamil and Punjabi cultures.


5.The Great Indian Novel
The Great Indian Novel is a satirical novel by Shashi Tharoor, first published by Viking Press in 1989. It is a fictional work that takes the story of the Mahabharata, the Indian epic, and recasts and resets it in the context of the Indian Independence Movement and the first three decades post-independence.
Figures from Indian history are transformed into characters from mythology, and the mythical story of India is retold as a history of Indian independence and subsequent history, up through the 1970s. Some critics have identified an element of subversion in the novel. The work includes numerous puns and allusions to famous works about India, such as those by Rudyard Kipling, Paul Scott, and E. M. Forster.


6.The White Tiger
The White Tiger is the debut novel by Indian author Aravind Adiga. It was first published in 2008 and won the 40th Man Booker Prize in the same year. The novel provides a darkly humorous perspective of India's class struggle in a globalized world as told through a retrospective narration from Balram Halwai, a village boy. 

In detailing Balram's journey first to Delhi, where he works as a chauffeur to a rich landlord, and then to Bangalore, the place to which he flees after killing his master and stealing his money, the novel examines issues of religion, caste, loyalty, corruption and poverty in India. Ultimately, Balram transcends his sweet-maker caste and becomes a successful entrepreneur, establishing his own taxi service. In a nation proudly shedding a history of poverty and underdevelopment, he represents, as he himself says, "tomorrow."


7. I Still Think About You
The best novels to the read-love story are I Still Think About You in which Aamir met Anvi who did not understand him better than her. But her enthusiasm for investigative reporting terrifies him no end. She is calling while arriving from a crime scene and agreeing to switch to anchoring when he discovers a gunshot. Will she be able to fulfil her promise.


8. The Inheritance of Loss
The Inheritance of Loss is the second novel by Indian author Kiran Desai. It was first published in 2006. It won a number of awards, including the Man Booker Prize for that year, the National Book Critics Circle Fiction Award in 2007, and the 2006 Vodafone Crossword Book Award.

It was written over a period of seven years after her first book, the critically acclaimed Hullabaloo in the Guava Orchard. Among its main themes are migration, living between two worlds, and between past and present.


9. The Twentieth Wife
The Twentieth Wife is about how a young widow named Mehrunissa, daughter of Persian refugees and wife of an Afghan commander, becomes Empress of the Mughal Empire under the name of Nur Jahan. Her second novel The Feast of Roses is the sequel to The Twentieth Wife. She is also the author of The Splendor of Silence, historical fiction set in a fictional Indian princely state just before Indian independence in 1947.


10. Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children
Midnight's Children is a 1981 novel by Indian author Salman Rushdie. It deals with India's transition from British colonialism to independence and the partition of India. It is considered an example of postcolonial, postmodern, and magical realist literature. The story is told by its chief protagonist, Saleem Sinai, and is set in the context of actual historical events. The style of preserving history with fictional accounts is self-reflexive.

Midnight's Children won both the Booker Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 1981.It was awarded the "Booker of Bookers" Prize and the best all-time prize winners in 1993 and 2008 to celebrate the Booker Prize 25th and 40th anniversary. In 2003, the novel was listed on the BBC's The Big Read poll of the UK's "best-loved novels" It was also added to the list of Great Books of the 20th Century, published by Penguin Books.


11. Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre /ɛər/ (originally published as Jane Eyre: An Autobiography) is a novel by English writer Charlotte Brontë, published under the pen name "Currer Bell", on 16 October 1847, by Smith, Elder & Co. of London. The first American edition was published the following year by Harper & Brothers of New York. Jane Eyre follows the experiences of its eponymous heroine, including her growth to adulthood and her love for Mr. Rochester, the brooding master of Thornfield Hall.4


12. The Last Song of Dusk
The Last Song Of Dusk is one of the best novels to read by Indian authors as it is a stunning story by Siddharth Dhanvant. The Novel is about four extraordinary lives. Anuradha Gandharva, gifted with astonishing beauty and magical songs, her husband, Vardhmaan, struggling with secret losses; Nandini, a deviously alluring artist with a penchant for panthers and walking on water and Shloka, the Gandharvas' delicate, disturbingly silent child. As their fates unravel in an old villa in 1920s' Bombay, they learn to navigate the ever-changing landscape of love.

Download The Last Song of Dusk

13. THE LAGOON
"The Lagoon" is a short story by Joseph Conrad composed in 1896 and first published in Cornhill Magazine in 1897. The story is about a white man, referred to as "Tuan" (the equivalent of "Lord" or "Sir"), who is travelling through an Indonesian rainforest and is forced to stop for the night with a distant Malay friend named Arsat. Upon arriving, he finds Arsat distraught, for his lover is dying. Arsat tells the distant and rather silent white man a story of his past.

Download THE LAGOON

14. A Suitable Boy
A Suitable Boy is a novel by Vikram Seth, published in 1993. At 1,349 pages (1,488 pages softcover) and 591,552 words, the book is one of the longest novels ever published in a single volume in the English language. A sequel, to be called A Suitable Girl, was due for publication in 2017. As of 2020 the novel was still unpublished.

A Suitable Boy is set in a newly post-independence, post-partition India. The novel follows the story of four families over a period of 18 months, and centres on Mrs. Rupa Mehra's efforts to arrange the marriage of her younger daughter, Lata, to a "suitable boy". Lata is a 19-year-old university student who refuses to be influenced by her domineering mother or opinionated brother, Arun. Her story revolves around the choice she is forced to make between her suitors Kabir, Haresh, and Amit.


15. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, first published on 14 October 1892. It contains the earliest short stories featuring the consulting detective Sherlock Holmes, which had been published in twelve monthly issues of The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. The stories are collected in the same sequence, which is not supported by any fictional chronology. The only characters common to all twelve are Holmes and Dr. Watson and all are related in first-person narrative from Watson's point of view.








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